Red Door Family Farm http://www.reddoorfamilyfarm.com Wausau Organic Vegetables, Fruits, and Meats Wed, 12 Sep 2018 20:18:38 +0000 en-US hourly 1 2018 CSA Newsletter: September 12, Week 15 http://www.reddoorfamilyfarm.com/2018-csa-newsletter-september-12-week-15/ Wed, 12 Sep 2018 20:15:51 +0000 http://www.reddoorfamilyfarm.com/?p=1579 Farm News

Six inches of rain on Tuesday! Hardly any rain all summer and then we get 6 inches in one night?! I could hardly believe the rain gauge and was nervous to walk the farm and see what sort of damage that amount of rain could cause. For the most part the farm faired very well. We are on a bit of a hill so there wasn’t much standing water and we had gotten the important stuff out (onions and most winter squash) before the rain. We plant our fields on contours and with grass lanes to help with erosion and it seemed to work. The only bummer was the 20 seconds of hail that shredded our perfectly ready to harvest spinach bed. I am frustrated that we lost all of that spinach but I feel pretty lucky that was all that was lost.

We had an adventurous day moving the pigs all the way to the other side of the farm. I was sweating it as those giant porkers looked longingly at our lush rows of vegetables. Tenzin assured me that they wouldn’t cross the teeny tiny little thread of hotwire that was barely on but I couldn’t help envisioning the worst. Although they didn’t cross the line, they didn’t exactly want to move either. Tenzin finally had to entice them with an entire block of cheese that he broke off Hansel and Gretel style. Now they are happily munching down the remainder of the sweet corn, stalks and all. Those are going to be some tasty pigs!

September 12th, Week 15

Clockwise from top: Brusselini, Rainbow carrots, salad turnips, cherry tomatoes, heirloom tomato, parsley, sweet peppers, potatoes, red and yellow onions. Enjoy!

Announcements:

~Tenzin and Haley are teaching a class at Grebe’s this Thursday. Get your ticket (from Grebe’s) before they are gone!

-September 29th dinner still has tickets available!

-Winter shares are now available- 8 extra weeks for $200. Same drop sites.

In your box this week…

Brusselini

Sweet Peppers-

Parsley

Salad turnips

Onions

Potatoes

Carrots

Ripe Slicing Tomatoes

Cherry tomatoes

Garlic

Coffee-

Weekly Serving Suggestions:

Brusselini (AKA, Brussel Tops)– These are the tops of the Brussels Sprouts. Brusselini shine in fresh slaws, they have a distinctive “nutty” flavor, much like their sprouts. Simply roll a few of the leaves together tightly and shave off the end of the roll until you have what looks like a pile of shredded cabbage. Then toss with your favorite vinaigrette. But, they can also be treated just like any other hearty green. Steamed, sautéed, or fried until tender. Try them in place of cabbage in the recipe of the week. Stores well in the crisper drawer.

Onions– Onions are cured, but best not to plan to store them all winter yet. Try in a sauce or salsa with fresh tomatoes or roasted tomatillos. Starting to develop a stronger flavor, so feel free to sautee these down or roast them up to balance out the sweet flavor. If they are beginning to pile up on you, try your hand at French onion soup, it’s pretty simple really and a nice fall treat.

Parsley- Oh, sweet Parsley, how you brighten my palate and allow me to feast heartily on fall providence without forgetting the bounty of longer summer days. I praise thee, and offer you with a full heart. (Stores well in a bag in the fridge and goes on almost anything, like an early-fall hash.)

Salad Turnips- We love these, a favorite of our children, they also work nicely for slaws, fresh and chopped salads. You can simply cut them into wedges and serve them as a fresh side. They would likely be spectacular as a quick-pickle. I’ll try it this week and let you know! Store them removed from the greens in a bag in the crisper drawer. Greens are great as a substitute for spinach. Works perfectly for scrambled egg dishes, or as a cooked greens sidedish.

Carrots- Store well in the crisper drawer or a bag in your fridge. Easy to use, just rinse and eat—I never peel mine. Great cooked with a little butter, salt, and dressed with fresh parsley. Also good grilled. Try shredding for salads and slaws or chopping for soups and stews. A veggie peeler can whittle them down to a pile of brightly colored curls to decorate any slaw or salad.

Sweet Bell Peppers- (some are long and pointy, all are sweet) These thick-walled, sweet peppers are great for slicing and snacking, or for roasting. Be careful not to overcook or you will lose the bright crunch that makes them so great. Good for salsa and dips, also great in pasta sauce or the recipe of the week! All peppers store well in the crisper drawer or in a bag/container if more than a few days. The small ones are extra sweet and perfect for fresh snacking or sliced thin for a fresh garnish. Great addition to salsas, eggs, or tomato sauces.

Potatoes- These potatoes are ready to be scrubbed, but leave the beautiful skins on. They’ve been washed once already, so don’t expect them to store all winter. Though they will store in a dry cool, dark place for quite some time. Good for boiling, but even better for roasting or mashing. These starchy spuds will fry up well in a skillet too. Try slicing them thin, just enough to coat the bottom of a heavy skillet about a centimeter deep. Then sautee in lots of pre-heated oil with some chopped onions until translucent. Cover with a half cup of whole milk or half and half, and reduce heat till it leaves a creamy sauce. Top with lots of salt and fresh ground black pepper as well as fresh chopped parsley.

Slicing tomatoes– Also best stored out of the fridge. Use on sandwiches, salads or wraps. These big slicers are good for enjoying a nice thick slice alongside a meal. Serve plain, with salt, brown sugar, or pesto on top. Store on the countertop out of direct light. Many heirloom varieties ripen from bottom to top. Slice them vertically to fully appreciate the flavor profile of these exquisite fruits. A slice on a sandwich, cold or grilled, sure goes a long way too.

Cherry Tomatoes– So easy, just pop the top and eat them. Also great sliced in half to top salads or set off a slaw dish. Keeps best out of the fridge. But they can be frozen whole, in a zibplock bag and used for saucing or for fancy ice cubes in the winter. Our girls think they count as popsicles, please don’t tell them otherwise.

Garlic- Fresh garlic is strong and nearly medicinal—some love it, some don’t. But roasted garlic is sweet and sublime, nearly everyone likes the flavor of roasted garlic. So next time you’re roasting something, think about throwing the whle head in the oven to roast, then squishing the cloves out into a container to store in the fridge and use throughout the week. Will store well on the countertop, out of direct sunlight.

Coffee (optional)

Recipe of the week…

Garden Skillet

Ingredients:

1 small onion (or a head of garlic) chopped

1 Tbsp Canola oil (or other high-temp oil)

2-3 small potatoes scrubbed and chopped small (skins on)

1 tsp dried rosemary

1 Tbsp butter

1-2 salad turnips, chopped

1-2 carrots scrubbed and chopped

2 Tbsp chopped fresh parsley

Sea salt and fresh ground black pepper

*Optional toppings are finely chopped peppers, beets, tomato wedges, fried eggs, etc.

**Optional substitute potatoes for rutabagas, turnips or just more beets and carrots

Directions:

Heat oil in a large, heavy skillet over medium high heat.

Add onions and potatoes, toss to coat then cover 2 mins until potatoes are warmed through and onions are translucent.

Stir.

Add butter and remaining root veggies. Stir to coat until all butter has melted.

Cover 2 minutes more, then remove lid.

Stir until lightly browned and potatoes and carrots are tender.

Remove from heat. Season liberally with fresh parsley, salt, and pepper.

*add any optional toppings or just rest and serve.

-Enjoy!

*I’ve also added some half and half before the second covering, and allowed it to reduce to a creamy sauce.

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2018 CSA Newsletter: September 5, Week 14 http://www.reddoorfamilyfarm.com/2018-csa-newsletter-september-5-week-14/ Wed, 05 Sep 2018 20:18:24 +0000 http://www.reddoorfamilyfarm.com/?p=1583 Farm News

We had an exciting week, as I’m sure many of you can relate to. The first day of school is always a big wakeup call that summer isn’t going to last forever. Leona is now in full day kindergarten and gets to ride the bus and everything! She was so excited.

We have continued to harvest squash and do general farm clean up projects. We have beds prepared for our garlic planting that will happen in October and beds for spring. This year we are trying something new and putting a big silage tarp over the spring beds to smother out weeds and try to make the “dry out” season quicker. Hopefully, this will make it easier to get into the field in the spring if it happens to be an overly wet year.

We are also preparing the hoophouses for their winter crops. We have kale and spinach planted already and lettuce, more spinach, and other salad mixes will be planted shortly.

September 5th, Week 14

From the top: Beets, Acorn squash, tomato, celery, onions, cherry tomatoes, sage, sweet peppers. Wine cap mushrooms, salad mix, edamame. Enjoy!

Announcements:

-Winter shares are now available- 8 extra weeks for $200. Same drop sites. If you talked to me at the farmers market please check in to reserve your spot!

~Tenzin forgot to put spaghetti squash in the newsletter last week. I hope you all figured it out!

In your box this week…

Wine Cap Mushrooms

Edamame

Celery

Sweet Peppers-

Onions

Sage

Beets

Salad Mix

Slicing Tomatoes (full shares only)

Cherry tomatoes

Acorn Squash

Coffee- (optional)

Weekly Serving Suggestions:

Edamame- These fuzzy little pods are actually just a variety of soy bean grown for fresh eating. Often served as an appetizer in Japanese restaurants, the simplest preparation is probably the best. Simply remove the fuzzy bean pods from the stalks and set aside. Bring a quart of well-salted water to a full rolling boil (approx. 1.5- 2 Tbsp salt). Add the bean pods and stir occasionally (over high heat) for about 3 min. Color should be bright and pods should still be floating. Remove from water and serve immediately with a separate bowl for discarded pods. Then everyone can shuck their own beans. The flavor is mild, but pleasant. And it’s great fun to sit around shucking little beans as you go!

Onions– Onions are now cured, so they will keep in the pantry, but these are not a storage variety, so don’t plan to keep them there too long. Onions can be diced and frozen for later use. But they go so well with the squash, sage and mushrooms, that we think you’ll enjoy them right away.

Sage- Sage is perhaps the most quintessential of fall herbs. I love it with sautéed mushrooms and onions. I also love it with butter and squash! Sage dries well, it is especially good fresh. Fried sage leaves are quite the rage, and it holds up well to heat when cooking. Stores well in a bag in the fridge.

Celery- I love celery, especially for fall soups. It adds a little bit of a bright parsley flavor with some crunch, if you add it just at the end of cooking. Celery also freezes easily for use in later soups and stews. Just chop and freeze in a bag, then grab some out whenever you like!

Beets- Bold, beautiful, and oh so good for you! Beets are easy to use, younger, tender-skinned beets don’t even need to be peeled (depending on what you’re doing with them).Stores well in the crisper drawer or a bag in your fridge, with the tops removed and stored in a separate bag. Beet greens are hearty and healthy, try them in scrambled eggs with goat cheese, or in the recipe of the week!

Sweet Peppers- These thick-walled, sweet peppers are great for slicing and snacking, or for roasting. Be careful not to overcook or you will lose the bright crunch that makes them so great. Good for salsa and dips, also great in pasta sauce or the recipe of the week! All peppers store well in the crisper drawer or in a bag/container if more than a few days. Great addition to salsas, eggs, or tomato sauces.

Salad Mix- It’s back, hooray! It is difficult to grow good salad mix in the heat of summer, but (somewhat sadly) those days appear to be behind us. Fresh and ready, just rinse and serve. We eat it by the handful, but classier people use cutlery and dressings. Great with oil and vinegar and some shredded beets, and sliced tomatoes. Stores well in a bag in the fridge. Rinse and spin it dry for best storage. Fresh is best though, great way to make a sandwich feel like a meal!

Slicing tomatoes– Also best stored out of the fridge. Use on sandwiches, salads or wraps. These big slicers are good for enjoying a nice thick slice alongside a meal. Serve plain, with salt, brown sugar, or pesto on top. Store on the countertop out of direct light. Many heirloom varieties ripen from bottom to top. Slice them vertically to fully appreciate the flavor profile of these exquisite fruits. A slice on a sandwich, cold or grilled, sure goes a long way too.

Cherry Tomatoes– So easy, just pop the top and eat them. Also great sliced in half to top salads or set off a main dish Keeps best out of the fridge.

Acorn Squash- One of the easiest squash to use, because it’s size and ribs make it easy cook, and plate. Simply chop in half, and scoop the seeds/pith out. Lay cut-side down on a roasting pan and roast at 350-400 for about 30-45 mins, or until skin punctures easily with a knife. From here they can be halved again and served with a dollop of butter and some maple syrup, or sage, and salt. Stores well anywhere out of direct light. Try the recipe of the week!

Wine Cap Mushrooms!– These are a great treat anytime we can get them. Wine caps grow in the ground outside, and as such, their timing and cleanliness are subject to the weather. The easiest way to clean them is to brush them off gently with a dry brush. But you can wash them with water just before use, if that’s easier. Brushing and washing will both reduce their storage life, so plan to do it when you’re ready to cook them. Mushrooms store best in a paper bag in the crisper drawer. Caps and stems are both delicious, simply chop them and sautee with onion/garlic and a generous amount of oil or butter until golden brown and thoroughly reduced in volume. Delicious with a little fresh chopped sage, too!

**Spaghetti Squash(I forgot to add this last week, but if it’s still around…!) The original veggie noodle! Split Squash in half carefully, with a long knife and scoop the seeds/pulp with a spoon. Roast or steam until the rind punctures easily. The longer you cook it, the sweeter and drier it will be. Roasting it will help it absorb whatever sauce you use. Allow to cool enough to handle, before scooping the stringy “noodles” with a fork or spoon. Scoop/scrape them such that they separate from each other. Serve with butter, salt and either parsley or maple syrup. Also great with your favorite spaghetti sauce. Stores well in the pantry or on the counter.

Coffee Nicaraguan Coffee

. (Taken from Condor’s website.)

Recipe of the week…

Savory Stuffed Acorn Squash

(adapted from Thedailymeal.com)

Ingredients

  • 1/2 rice, uncooked
  • 2 acorn squash
  • 2 Tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/4 onion, finely chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic, finely chopped
  • 1 small zucchini, small chop
  • 2 medium tomatoes, roughly chopped
  • ¾ cup mushrooms, chopped
  • 2 Cups chopped beet greens
  • 1 Tablespoon paprika
  • 1 Tablespoon ground cumin
  • 1/4 Cup nutritional yeast
  • 1/2 Teaspoon sea salt
  • Dash of freshly ground black pepper

Directions

Cook the rice according to directions

Preheat the oven to 400 degrees.

Gently scrub skins of the squash and cut off any long stems. Slice the acorn squash in ½, from end to end, and scoop out seeds and loose membranes.

To prepare the stuffing, sauté the red onion in olive oil for 2 minutes over medium heat or until onion begins to soften. Add the garlic and sauté for 1 minute until it just begins to turn a very light golden brown. Add the zucchini, tomatoes, and mushrooms and cook for 5 minutes or until the vegetables begin to soften. Add the beet greens, paprika, cumin, yeast, salt, and pepper.

Stir and let simmer for 5 minutes. Stir in the cooked rice and remove from heat.

Turn the squash cut-side up and scoop stuffing mixture into each squash ½, packing it well and mounding the mixture high. Wrap each squash ½ in aluminum foil and place on a cookie sheet.

Bake for 1 hour until the squash is thoroughly tender and easy to pierce with a fork.

* could substitute shelled edamame for the zucchini in this recipe.

-Enjoy!

Best guess for next week:

Carrots

Potatoes

Honey Boat Delicata squash

Lunch box peppers

Salad Turnips

Tomatoes

Basil

 

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2018 CSA Newsletter: August 29, Week 13 http://www.reddoorfamilyfarm.com/2018-csa-newsletter-august-29-week-13/ Wed, 29 Aug 2018 12:17:33 +0000 http://www.reddoorfamilyfarm.com/?p=1570 Farm News

We had such an amazing time at our farm to table dinner on Saturday. The food was great, the weather turned from stormy to spectacular, and we met so many really nice people! It’s a lot of work getting the farm set up and cleaned up while keeping the farm running. It is also so amazing to watch all of our crops turn into this feast, and so enjoyable to see people coming together to enjoy it.

On top of all of the busyness of the dinner, we got all of our onions in and curing, all of our potatoes harvested, and have begun to bring the winter squash in to cure. We are starting to dry herbs for the winter shares and are even planting our winter time kale (for winter shares and winter market).

August 29th, Week 13

Clockwise from top: Leeks, tomatillos, sweet corn, edamame, red cabbage, garlic, cherry tomatoes, slicer tomato, poblano peppers, spaghetti squash, oregano, cauliflower. Enjoy!

Announcements:

Winter shares are now available- 8 extra weeks for $200. If you are interested in knowing what might be in the box, check our facebook page for last year’s photos.

In your box this week…

Edamame!

Sweet Corn

Poblano Peppers (on the spicy side)

Leeks

Tomatillos (full shares)

Oregano

Garlic

Ripe Slicing Tomatoes

Cherry tomatoes

Red Cabbage

Cauliflower

Melons (small shares)

Coffee- (optional) Ethiopia

Weekly Serving Suggestions:

Tomatillos- Like a gift-wrapped little green tomato, but sweet and ripe! Best when roasted or grilled. Then they can be added to soups, sauces, salsa and stews. Roast them and freeze in a quart bag for wintertime stews if desired. Otherwise store in a bag in the fridge until ready. These little things are full of a pectin-like jelly that helps to thicken salsas and stews. Can store at room temp for several days, but if longer storage is needed, store in the fridge (not in a bag). Tomatillos also contain a natural meat tenderizer making them a great addition to meaty stews. Salsa verde braised pork is also a winner!

Leeks– Leeks have such a lovely, sweet, creamy flavor and texture. While they do need some oil to sautee, they almost turn into their own butter! Split leeks down the middle and give them a rinse to remove any dirt caught in the leaves. Chop them across the grain using all the white and light-green parts. Leaves are good, up until they start to get too tough (usually an inch or two from the stalk). Store in a bag or crisper drawer.

Cabbage- These fresh cabbages are a little bit sweeter and more tender than a typical storage cabbage, but will also keep for quite a while in the crisper drawer if needed. Perfect for chopping into thin strips for slaws. Red cabbages cook up nicely, but the color can tend to bleed. Reds make excellent and beautiful kraut.

Garlic- Cured, this garlic should keep well on the countertop. Perfect for salsas and almost everything else. I typically find that if a recipe calls for 2-3 cloves of garlic and I add 5-6, I’m never disappointed. Add just before removing from heat for extra-strong garlic flavor. Sautee for a few minutes ahead of the rest of your ingredients to mellow it and generate that sweet, umami flavor without the bite.

Edamame- These fuzzy little pods are actually just a variety of soy bean grown for fresh eating. Often served as an appetizer in Japanese restaurants, the simplest preparation is probably the best. Simply remove the fuzzy bean pods from the stalks and set aside. Bring a quart of well-salted water to a full rolling boil (approx. 1.5- 2 Tbsp salt). Add the bean pods and stir occasionally (over high heat) for about 3 min. Color should be bright and pods should still be floating. Remove from water and serve immediately with a separate bowl for discarded pods. Then everyone can shuck their own beans. The flavor is mild, but pleasant. And it’s great fun to sit around shucking little beans as you go!

Poblano Peppers- Poblanos are probably my favorite spicy pepper. They are mildly spicy, but full of pepper flavor and easy to use without making a whole dish taste like lava. Stores well in the fridge, or roast them for freezing. Roasted poblanos are a really delicious way to add a lot of depth and a little heat to a dish. Whether it’s a salsa verde, or a chile relleno!

Cauliflower- Cauliflower will keep for up to a week in the fridge, but it can start to develop an “off” odor if it stores for very long. While these are exceptionally fresh, we always recommend using them sooner rather than later. Cauliflower is so versatile! I especially like it in tomato sauces, or roasted. But, it’s also really good raw and dipped. A simple steaming in salted water is more than enough, then add cheese or lemon juice to taste.

Slicing tomatoes– Also best stored out of the fridge. Use on sandwiches, salads or wraps. These big slicers are good for enjoying a nice thick slice alongside a meal. Serve plain, with salt, brown sugar, or pesto on top. Store on the countertop out of direct light. Many heirloom varieties ripen from bottom to top. Slice them vertically to fully appreciate the flavor profile of these exquisite fruits. A slice on a sandwich, cold or grilled, sure goes a long way too.

Cherry Tomatoes– So easy, just pop the top and eat them. Also great sliced in half to top salads or set off a slaw dish. Keeps best out of the fridge.

Sweet Corn– Fresh and delicious. This bi-color corn is our favorite variety—the sweetest of the three we grow. The sugars in it will quickly fade to starches. Be sure to use it as quickly as possible for fresh eating or corn on the cob. After a few days it will be best roasted or removed from the cob (where it can be added to soups, salsas or succotash!) Fresh it’s almost like candy, we ate some in the field today—for research purposes, obviously. Can store in or out of the fridge.

Oregano– Oregano is a delicious herb that easily walks the line between Italian cuisine and Mexican cuisine. To use simply remove the small leaves from the tough stem and chop. Oregano can withstand some heat, but is also delicate enough to go on without cooking (if chopped finely). Keeps well in a loose bag in the fridge. Excellent choice for sauces, soups, and stews!

Coffee Organic Ethiopian Coffee

Ethiopia is the birthplace of coffee and is home to some of the most diverse varieties on the planet. Due to this, the cup profile can vary drastically but certain regions produce coffees that are distinctive. Yirgacheffe is traditionally known for its jasmine perfume floral and citrusy taste finish. (Taken from Condor’s website.)

Recipe of the week…

Cauliflower Blue Cheese Soup

Ingredients:
2-3 Tbsp butter

1 cup chopped leeks

4-5 cups chopped cauliflower

3 cups chicken or veggie stock

½ cup half and half

2-3 Tbsp chopped fresh Herb (oregano, sage, tarragon, or a mix) divided

5-6 oz crumbled blue cheese, divided

Salt and Pepper to taste

Directions:

Slowly cook leeks in butter until tender. Add cauliflower and stock, simmer until very tender, 12-15 mins.

Puree. Add half and half plus ½ of the herbs.

Simmer 3-4 mins. Stir in half the cheese, salt and pepper. Serve with remaining herbs and cheese as a garnish.

-Enjoy!

 

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2018 CSA Newsletter: August 22, Week 12 http://www.reddoorfamilyfarm.com/2018-csa-newsletter-august-22-week-12/ Wed, 22 Aug 2018 12:14:49 +0000 http://www.reddoorfamilyfarm.com/?p=1566 Farm News

Oh man, what a delicious week! We are gorging ourselves on sweet corn, melons, and cherry tomatoes. Haven’t turned on my stove in a week! We did, however, stoke up the woodfired oven and roasted tomatoes, onions, peppers, and tomatillos for sauces. This is the first year that we have done that and it was super fast, and gave a great smoky flavor.

On Thursday we will be harvesting all of the onions and begin to cure them in our hoophouse. Curing onions is really just drying out the outside layers which will then protect the inside. The difference between an onion that has cured well and one that has not is usually dependent on whether the stem, or belly button (as I like to call it) seals completely. If it doesn’t seal, moisture and then bacteria can get in and start the rotting process from the inside out. We do our best to get all of the onions dried out nicely but it is also a lesson in patience and sorting later to be sure we pull out the bad ones.

Looking forward to the farm dinner this weekend! We are sold out on Saturday but the September dinner is still open. Hope to see you!

August 21st, Week 12

Clockwise from top: Sunflower, cucumbers, peppers, watermelon, sweet corn, jalapenos, potatoes, slicing tomato, cherry tomatoes, parsley, onions (red and white), cantaloupe. Enjoy!

Announcements:

Paste tomatoes available! 20# for $20 delivered to your dropsite or the Saturday farmers market next week.

U-pick paste tomatoes also available! Call or email to set up a time.

In your box this week…

Watermelons

Jalapenos

Sweet Corn!

Cantaloupe (full shares)

Sweet Bell Peppers

Onions- not cured (refridgerate)

Parsley

Cucumbers

Cherry tomatoes

Slicing tomatoes –(full shares)

Red Potatoes

Coffee- (optional) Colombia

Weekly Serving Suggestions:

Watermelon- Stores well in a cool location, or the fridge. Refrigerate for refreshing crunch and coolness, or leave unrefrigerated for maximum sweetness. There’s a million fun recipes for watermelon, but these are delicious, so I recommend just slicing and eating!

Jalapenos- Hot peppers! Jalapenos are sort of the quintessential spicy pepper. Handle with care, though they vary widely in heat. Most of the heat of a jalapeno is stored in the white membrane around the seeds, so leave it in or take it out as you see fit. Perfect for salsas, and would be a great addition to the recipe of the week.

Cucumbers– So fresh, so easy. Just slice and serve. Or try topping with salt or seasoning. Also great chopped and stirred into plain yogurt as a dressing for seasoned meats or whole grain salads, add a little bit of your favorite fresh herb (green coriander is perfect for this). Stores well in the crisper drawer of the fridge (or in a bag in the fridge). Try making cucumber water on these hot, thick days. Drop a few fresh slices of cucumber into a glass of ice water and enjoy the cooling hint of cucumber. Or make cucumber lemonade puree a whole cucumber (or two). Then press through a strainer to remove the coarser pulp (a little is fine) then add to a pitcher of your favorite lemonade. Cucumbers are loaded with electrolytes and have a cooling effect on the palate (kind of like mint).

Fresh Sweet Onions– Keep these in a bag in the fridge for best storage (they are not cured). Perfect for fresh eating, try in a sauce or salsa with fresh tomatoes or roasted tomatillos. Starting to develop a stronger flavor, so feel free to sautee these down or roast them up to balance out the sweet flavor. Also great in bruschetta or Panzanella (think marinated crouton salad). Wonderful on the grill for kebabs or just mixed grilled/roasted veggies. Slice into scoops for dipping too!

Sweet Corn- We love sweetcorn, but it’s best as fresh as possible. Store in a bag in the fridge, if necessary, but try to eat it right away, as the sugars in the corn quickly begin to turn to starches. Featured in the recipe of the week. But you can cook up a few for plain corn on the cob, and still have some for the recipe of the week. The key to cooking corn on the cob, is not to overdo it. This corn is so fresh and good, you can just eat it raw! Just a minute or two in boiling water or 3-4 mins on the grill (shucked, longer if cooking in the husk).

Red Potatoes- One of my favorite staples. These are great chopped and sautéed in oil for a skillet-style breakfast with peppers, onions, jalapeno, parsley,, tomato, and eggs. But also, perfect for roasting, mashing, or smashing! These will store for a while in the larder, but they’re already washed once, so keep an eye on them or store them in the fridge.

Fresh Parsley- keeps well in the fridge, but freshest is best for flavor. Just mince and add to almost any dish, pairs well with other herbs too. Try it in the recipe of the week.

Sweet Bell Peppers- These thick-walled, sweet peppers are great for slicing and snacking, or for roasting. Be careful not to overcook or you will lose the bright crunch that makes them so great. Good for salsa and dips, also great in pasta sauce or the recipe of the week! All peppers store well in the crisper drawer or in a bag/container if more than a few days. Great addition to salsas, eggs or the recipe of the week!

Cherry Tomatoes- For best flavor and texture, store out of the fridge. Colorful, flavorful and so fun to “pop” in your mouth. These make a great snack all by themselves, but they can also be sliced in half for a salad. Or roasted, dried or even frozen whole!

Slicing tomatoes (full shares)– Also best stored out of the fridge. Use on sandwiches, salads or wraps. These big slicers are good for enjoying a nice thick slice alongside a meal. Serve plain, with salt, brown sugar, or pesto on top. Store on the countertop out of direct light. Many heirloom varieties ripen from bottom to top. Slice them vertically to fully appreciate the flavor profile of these exquisite fruits.

Coffee (optional)

Recipe of the week…

Sweet Corn and Wild Rice Fritters

(from Asparagus to Zucchinni)

Ingredients:

1 cup cooked wild rice

Kernels cut from 2 ears of cooked corn (perfect for leftovers, also works well uncooked)

1 cup flour

1 cup milk (added slowly, may not use all)

1 egg

¼ cup finely chopped onion, leek or scallion

¼ cup finely chopped bell pepper

2 Tbsp minced parsley

1 clove garlic, minced

½ tsp salt, or more to taste

Canola oil (for frying)

Tomatillo salsa (or your favorite salsa, sour cream, or hot sauce)

*(Diced jalapeno, optional)

Directions:

Mix everything but the oil and salsa.

Add ¼” of oil to a heavy skillet. Heat over medium until hot and shimmery. (Should bubble immediately if you add a bit of the batter to it.)

Drop small amounts of the batter (2 Tbs-1/3 cup depending on your preference) about ¼ cup.

Cook a few at a time, to avoid crowding. Cook each batch until brown and cooked through. Drain on to paper towel and serve with salsa or dips! Makes 8 large pancakes, or up to 24 little fritter-bites.

-Enjoy!

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2018 CSA Newsletter: August 15, Week 11 http://www.reddoorfamilyfarm.com/2018-csa-newsletter-august-15-week-11/ Tue, 14 Aug 2018 20:44:21 +0000 http://www.reddoorfamilyfarm.com/?p=1547  

 ☛ Announcements: Farm dinner is coming up on August 25th!

 

Farm News

Another lovely week of growing. It has been very melon-y around here which no one is complaining about. Some years we don’t get a single melon and some years it seems like we are swimming in them. Melons love it hot and we have had a lot of good heat for them. We also didn’t have a lot of pressure from cucumber beetles this year. Last year the cucumber beetles were pretty destructive so this year we covered the plants with row cover until the plants started to flower. We uncover them when the flowers come on so that they can be pollinated and make fruit!

Believe it or not, Tenzin and I are already planning where everything will be planted for next year. In the next couple of weeks, we will put down fertility (chicken manure), making beds, and covering the beds with big plastic tarps. The weeds will germinate under the tarps and then, if our timing and water is right, they will die from lack of sun. The tarps also will help keep the integrity of the beds until spring. When we uncover them next year they should be much dryer and with less seed pressure so we can get into the field early and bring you all the good stuff as early as possible.

We will also be planning where the different plant families will be so we don’t spread disease around the farm. This is mandatory for our organic certification but it is also important to being responsible farmers.

August 15th, Week 11

Clockwise from top: Leeks, cantaloupe, cucumbers, carrots, sunflower, zucchini, sweet peppers, tomatoes, cauliflower, broccoli, dill, garlic, eggplant (fulls). Enjoy!

In your box this week…

Cantaloupe

Bell Peppers (colorful, not spicy)

Slicing Tomatoes

Fresh Dill

Cherry Tomatoes

Leeks

Cucumbers

Cauliflower- white, orange, or purple

Broccoli

Carrots

Zucchini

Eggplant (full shares only)

Garlic

Flowers! (because beauty matters)

Coffee- (optional)

Weekly Serving Suggestions:

Cantaloupe- Why did two melons have a big wedding? Because they “cantaloupe!” Just kidding, but I do love ripe cantaloupe almost enough to marry it… Cantaloupe is delicious and easy to use. Just slice, scoop the seeds and eat. It can be balled, chopped into chunks or served in thin slices with prosciutto and crusty bread. Store it in the fridge, but don’t wait too long!

Slicing Tomatoes- Perfect for slicing, but flavorful and versatile. Easy to use for a sauce. Try sauteeing chopped tomato and leeks until soft, then adding some heavy cream and oregano. Salt and pepper and cook until slightly reduced and thickened. Add a dollop of fresh butter and whisk in while removing from heat. Makes a lovely butter sauce for pasta!

Cucumbers– Tzatziki sauce is easy to make. Combine peeled and seeded cucumbers with greek yogurt and dill and just a bit of lemon or lemon zest and salt. Delicious on falafel, lamb, chicken, or almost anything! Be creative, store in the fridge.

Leeks– Taste like onions, but they sautee up so nicely into a thick buttery smooth sauce. Leeks are ideal for sauces, soups and stews. Store them in the fridge in a bag or the crisper drawer.

Fresh Dill- Try the Tzatziki sauce from the cucumber section. Fresh dill is also great in a vinaigrette, or with honey and lemon as a glaze for roasted veggies or meats (we especially like it on carrots)! Stores well enough in a bag in the fridge. Can be stored in a sealed bag in the freezer, as well.

Carrots- Fresh, crunchy, tender and delicious. Enjoy them raw, roasted or grilled. However you slice ‘em they’re some of the best around. Store them separated from the tops in a bag or crisper drawer of the fridge. Finely diced carrots, make an excellent sweetener for tomato sauce too!

Eggplant- Beautiful and suggestive, eggplant do a great job of holding flavors to be reduced through longer cooking. They make a perfect addition to a ratatouille, mousakka, or just a simple tomato dish. Have someone who doesn’t like mushrooms? Sauteeing eggplants in oil or butter until golden brown is a great substitute for the texture of cooked mushrooms in many dishes.

Sweet Bell Peppers- Beautiful to behold. Sweet and tart, peppers add a layer of flavor to almost any dish. Try a diced pepper salsa with or without tomatoes! Peppers can also be roasted and frozen for use in soups and stews later on! Stores well in the fridge. Red, green, and purple!

Cherry Tomatoes- Featured in the recipe of the week this week (but don’t worry if you already ate them all, you can use any tomatoes). Sweet and delicious, cherries are a great snack all by themselves. Cherries can be stored on the countertop out of direct sunlight.

Garlic– This garlic is only partially cured, so while it will keep on the counter for a week or so, don’t expect it to last till spring in the pantry. Garlic is glorious and makes almost everything better. For strong, bright garlic flavor mince it fine and add it after cooking. For a more subtle umami boost, add it earlier in larger pieces (I’ll often add whole, or just lightly crushed cloves to a soup or roast.)

Broccoli– I’ve heard broccoli referred to as the “most versatile vegetable.” I have to assume that is because it only needs a short bit of heat, and can be added to nearly everything. While I like to steam long “branches of broccoli that include a fair bit of “trunk”. I also find that chopping the whole thing (except the thicker skin of the stem) finely makes it much easier to add to a sauce, or egg dish. Our girls are especially fond of mac n cheese with broccoli (sometimes we start dinner late too!) Stores best in a bag in the fridge.

Cauliflower– Purple, white, or orange! It is very versatile, easy to add to a ratatouille or anything else really. Also very good roasted whole. There are a few caterpillars still hiding in and amongst the heads, so soak or clean them as you go. Stores well in a bag in the fridge.

Zucchinni– Been a few days! Zucchini are great in sauce, slaw, eggs, you name it. If you’re bored of it, you can shred it, salt it, let the juices run out of it, then, then freeze it in a bag for soup or zucchini bread this winter. Stores well in the crisper drawer.

Recipe of the week…

“Mid-Summer” Ratatouille

From: Savour magazine (adapted by me).

Ingredients:

10 Tbsp Olive oil (divided)
3 Bell peppers (chopped and seeded)
¼ cup (loosely packed) fresh oregano

2 tbsp thyme
1 or more heads of garlic, cloves peeled
1-2 leeks, cleaned and chopped

1-2 eggplants, chopped

1-2 zucchinni, sliced

1 head of cauliflower cleaned and chopped into bite-size pieces

2 pints cherry tomatoes, or equivalent
21/4 tsp kosher salt (divided)
2 tsp vinegar (preferably red wine)

Fresh ground black pepper

Directions:

Heat 3 Tbsp oil in large pot over medium-high. Add bell peppers leeks, garlic and ½ tsp salt. Cook, stirring often until slightly softened. 5-6 mins, transfer to a large bowl.

Add 4 Tbsp oil to pot. When shimmering, add eggplant, cook, stirring often. When slightly softened, about 5 mins, transfer to bowl with the peppers.

Add remaining 3 Tbsp oil to pot. Add zucchinni, cauliflower, and ½ tsp salt. Cook, stirring often, until slightly softened, about 5 mins.

Add bell pepper mixture back into the pot. Stir to combine, and cover to simmer over medium-low and cook, stirring occasionally, until tender (about 10 mins).

Stir in tomatoes and ½ tsp salt. Cook, covered, until tomatoes burst (or about 8 mins). Uncover and stir in vinegar, black pepper and remaining ¾ tsp salt.

Enjoy!

*serve with pasta, crusty bread, or potatoes.

*enjoy!

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2018 CSA Newsletter: August 8, Week 10 http://www.reddoorfamilyfarm.com/2018-csa-newsletter-august-8-week-10/ Tue, 07 Aug 2018 21:29:34 +0000 http://www.reddoorfamilyfarm.com/?p=1541 Farm News

Week 10 means the half way point for the season. It is always amazing to me how fast summer goes by but I love watching the food change as the season builds. This week is loaded! We just couldn’t help ourselves from adding that one last thing, and another last thing, and one last, last, last thing. Eat in this week!!

All of the winter crops are germinated now so we are faced with the daunting task of hand weeding and thinning 19 beds are carrots and beets. We do use a cultivation tractor (new this year!) which really takes the edge off but all the beets still need to be thinned (did you know each beet seed contains 2-4 plants?), and the carrots will need one good in row weeding. The important parts of this job are: A) Good music or an interesting podcast, B) Long pants, C) An interesting topic of discussion D) Water, E) A good attitude (never look up at the whole field, just the row we are in). It always seems a bit unattainable at the start but we will get through it, just in time for harvest.

Speaking of harvest, the garlic got pulled this week thanks to all of our great help! Garlic is planted in October, so it is our longest crop. It always feels ceremonious when it is time to pull it up. It looks like a pretty good harvest so we are happy.

August 8th, Week 10

Clockwise from top: Melons!, broccoli, celery, cilantro, flowers, green beans, cucumbers, okra, garlic, onions, peppers, kale. Enjoy!

Announcements: Melons!

U-pick beans available this week. Call or email to set up a time.

In your box this week…

Melons!!! Sun Jewel (these are not overgrown cucumbers)

Bell Peppers (colorful, not spicy)

Slicing Tomatoes

Fresh Cilantro

Paste (or dicing) Tomatoes

Fresh Sweet Onions- red and white

Cucumbers

Celery

Broccoli

Snap Beans

Kale

Okra

Garlic

Flowers! (because beauty matters)

Coffee- (optional)

Weekly Serving Suggestions:

Melons!- These strange looking melons are sweet, mild and juicy. Don’t overlook them, they are not past-prime cucumbers… though they kind of look that way. Melons store best in the fridge, and can keep up to a week (if you can wait that long). These Sun Jewel melons are one of the earliest ripening, which makes it possible to get a crop this far north. You can simply cut in half lengthwise and scoop out the seeds, then either slice into 1” half-moons and eat by hand, or scoop with a melon baller. Makes a very refreshing drink, when blended with some water and ice (maybe even a peeled and seeded cucumber). I’m proud any year we get melons in the boxes, so please enjoy! Try them Italian-Style with Prosciutto, parmesan and strong coffee for breakfast! These (Korean style) melons easily walk the line between sweet and savory. Sweet enough for a dessert, but they go nicely in a salad or on the grill as well!

Slicing Tomatoes- Juicy Heirlooms and firm red slicers both pack a lot of flavor, especially in the juice and gooey bits around the seeds. A nice thick slice is delicious all by itself, or topped with pesto, baba ganoush, salt, or on a sandwich. They also make an amazing sauce, because of all that flavor, but their juiciness tends to make it take a long time to cook down to the proper consistency. Their texture will preserve best out of the fridge for fresh eating, but they will keep longest in the fridge. Try them chopped fine as a “fresh-sauce” for al-dente pasta (or anything else that will soak up that extra juice.) Many heirloom varieties ripen from bottom to top. Slice them vertically to fully appreciate the flavor profile of these exquisite fruits.

Cucumbers– We’ve been drinking cucumber-melon juice all week. But cukes are easily added to salads fresh salsas (pico de gallo), sandwiches, or just as a side dish or vessel for dips. Be creative, store in the fridge.

Fresh Sweet Onions– Keep these in a bag in the fridge for best storage (they are not cured). Perfect for fresh eating, try in a sauce or salsa with fresh tomatoes or roasted tomatillos. Also great in bruschetta or any other lightly cooked application. Also wonderful on the grill for kebabs or just mixed grilled/roasted veggies. Slice into scoops for dipping too!

Fresh Cilantro- is absolutely delicious (unless you’re part of the 15% of the population who can’t stand it—in which case, just give it to someone else). It goes great in salsa verde and pico de gallo. But it also shines in a Peruvian potato salad, with chicken (added after cooking, of course), and in a great many other dishes. It’s bust of bright color and flavor are exciting and invigorating when added just before serving. Cilantro stores well in a small vase in the fridge, or wrapped in a damp paper towel inside a bag in the fridge.

Snap Beans- Fresh Beans are lovely and easy to use. These will be green, purple, yellow, and/or speckled. The purple and speckled beans will lose some of their color when cooked. A light steaming or simple marinade will do the trick to make them a tasty addition to any dish. Could be added to the recipe of the week if chopped small and allowed to marinate. Steam them and drizzle with oil or butter and salt. Also great for eating fresh (raw) or with dip. Will keep well in a bag in the fridge.

Celery- Celery has a strong flavor, that can seem bitter on it’s own. But, when paired with a rich dip (baba ganoush, hummus, peanut butter, etc.) it really shines and is packed with nutrients. Celery can be chopped and frozen for use in wintertime soups and stews as well. Stores well in a bag in the fridge. Celery juices well with carrots and/or cucumbers too! Part of the trinity of creole cooking, and mirepoix in French cuisine, celery makes a great base for soups and sauces.

Sweet Bell Peppers- Three colors: Red, Green, and Purple. Beautiful and subtly different. The red peppers, thick and sweet, are perfect for slicing and eating raw (maybe with some dip). Greens are somewhat more “peppery” and tart, great for roasting and sauteeing. The purple peppers are mild and thin, perfect for shaving into a salad or slaw. Peppers store well in the crisper drawer, or in a bag. Try a diced pepper salasa with or without tomatoes!

Paste tomatoes- Bred to make sauce with a high solids to liquid composition, these varieties are great for dicing fresh or rendering into thick unctuous sauce for now or later. Tomato sauce freezes and cans easily. Tomatoes can also be frozen whole, for later use in soups and sauces, though they will liquefy when thawed. Paste tomatoes are less flavorful than their juicier brethren, but these are some of the most flavorful paste tomatoes you’ll find, and they shine diced and added fresh to salsas, eggs, potatoes, etc. One of our favorite breakfasts around here is fried potatoes (think homefries) with a fried egg laid on top, dressed up with fresh diced tomatoes and cilantro, salt and pepper! For fresh eating, best stored out of the fridge or direct sunlight. For longest storage, keep in the refridgerator.

Garlic– This garlic is only partially cured, so while it will keep on the counter for a week or so, don’t expect it to last till spring in the pantry. Garlic is glorious and makes almost everything better. For strong, bright garlic flavor mince it fine and add it after cooking. For a more subtle umami boost, add it earlier in larger pieces (I’ll often add whole, or just lightly crushed cloves to a soup or roast.)

Broccoli– I’ve heard broccoli referred to as the “most versatile vegetable.” I have to assume that is because it only needs a short bit of heat, and can be added to nearly everything. While I like to steam long “branches of broccoli that include a fair bit of “trunk”. I also find that chopping the whole thing (except the thicker skin of the stem) finely makes it much easier to add to a sauce, or egg dish. Our girls are especially fond of mac n cheese with broccoli (sometimes we start dinner late too!) Stores best in a bag in the fridge.

Okra– I am not a very experienced Okra chef, but I’m starting to work on that. I like to think of it as a thickening agent. I often chop some into my tomato sauce, just a pod or two and let the gooeyness simmer out of it, then puree it up with the rest. It adds a little heartiness to the flavor and an unctuousness (or richness) to the texture of the sauce. Okra stores well in the fridge, but should stay dry, don’t wrap it in a plastic bag.

Kale– A veggie-vore’s staple. Kale is always an easy way to add important nutrients including folic acid and iron to almost any dish. A little wilted kale dressed up with salt and vinegar or soysauce makes a quick sidedish to any meal. Chopped kale can be added to most any dish (including the recipe of the week) just before removing from heat. Store kale in a bag in the fridge, for best results. Kale chips are easy to make and will disappear before your eyes!

 

Recipe of the week…

Basic Blender Italian Tomato Sauce

From: Asparagus to zucchini, (with editorials by me)

Ingredients:
Lots of tomatoes, chopped
Small amount of Basil and parsley (dry or fresh)
A large amount of oregano
2 or more garlic cloves, minced
1-2 carrots finely chopped
Salt and pepper
Olive oil

(Optional: Okra, celery, sweet or spicy peppers, onions, kale or other cooking greens)

Guidelines:
Use lots of garlic!

Carrots are often used as a sweetener

Blend the tomatoes to an almost pureed texture.

Gradually add herbs, garlic, and carrots. (if using fresh herbs, add them later in the cooking process. Fresh herbs will release their flavor more readily and the subtleties will get lost with a long cooking time (any greens should be added in the last few minutes of cooking.))

Slowly cook the mixture in a deep heavy-bottomed skillet or pot.

When sauce has reduced about halfway, to the texture you want, add salt and pepper.

Add several tablespoons of olive oil before reheating for serving.

Makes any quantitiy.

Serve over pasta, or fried eggs, potatoes, or grilled meats. Top with parmesan or fresh herbs for flair!

 

*This is a great and highly versatile recipe that can accommodate many additions (such as chopped and sautéed mushrooms or eggplant, or even zucchini! Add things earlier or later depending on how you want the texture and flavor to be.) Sauce freezes well for later use, so make a big batch, use half right away and freeze half for the next time!

*enjoy!

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2018 CSA Newsletter: August 1, Week 9 http://www.reddoorfamilyfarm.com/2018-csa-newsletter-august-1-week-9/ Wed, 01 Aug 2018 19:05:11 +0000 http://www.reddoorfamilyfarm.com/?p=1536 Farm News

Can you believe it’s almost August!? I love August on the farm. The wild flowers are in full swing and the food is so bountiful. I find myself snacking through the whole morning and wondering why I’m not starving at lunch time like I am all spring. We even ate our first melon out of the field this week (IN JULY!!) and the sweet corn is already making ears.

The first big harvest will happen this week when we pull all of the garlic for curing. To harvest the garlic, we take the tractor with an undercutter on the back and lift the soil just below the garlic bulbs. This loosens the soil enough that we can pull the garlic up without having to use a digging fork. All of the bulbs then get harvested by hand and put on a trailer. We lay it all out in the greenhouse for about 2 weeks until the skin dries out protecting the cloves. Once they finished curing we clean the outside layer of skin off, removing any dirt, cut the stalk down and the roots off. Any bulbs with imperfections will be set aside for green garlic and any exceptional bulbs will be set aside for seed garlic. The seed garlic will have to be cracked open and every clove will act like a seed to be planted in October. The rest is ready to eat and will store for up to a year! I love me some garlic!

August 1st, Week9

Clockwise from top: Parsley, tomatillos, cucumbers broccoli (or cauliflower), carrots, jalapenos, fresh garlic, cherry tomatoes, salad mix, tomatoes, beans, onions, zucchini. Enjoy!

Announcements:

U pick beans are available for anyone interested! Call or email to set up a time.

Check your Broccoli and Cauliflower for cabbage caterpillars. If you don’t want to look for them, soak the heads in salt water and they will gracefully exit.

In your box this week…

Salad mix

Carrots

Parsley

Tomatillos

Fresh Garlic

Cauliflower

Broccoli/ Cauliflower

Fresh Sweet Onions- white

Cucumbers

Snap Beans

Zucchini

Peppers- Jalapenos or shishitos

Slicing Tomatoes

Paste Tomatoes

Cherry Tomatoes (Full shares only)

and a Zinnia! (just because we love you)

Coffee- (optional)

Weekly Serving Suggestions:

Salad Mix- Fresh, green, easy and good for you. Summery weather makes salad a great choice. Enjoy plain, with dressing, or pile it into wraps, burgers, sandwiches, etc. Top with cucumber slices, carrot curls, tomatoes, blue cheese, whatever you like. Stores well in the bag in the fridge, add a small piece of paper towel to the bottom of the bag for extended storage.

Fresh Parsley- Parsley is a great summery herb. Easy to use, it can go in almost anything puree it with carrot tops for a unique chimichurri. Try it in the gazpacho recipe below. Parsley also goes great in a fresh salsa (or “pico de gallo”). Stores well wrapped in a bag in the fridge, add a wet piece of paper towel around the base for extra longevity.

Cucumbers– So fresh, so easy. Just slice and serve. Or try topping with salt or seasoning. Also great chopped and stirred into plain yogurt as a dressing for seasoned meats or whole grain salads, add a little bit of your favorite fresh herb. Stores well in the crisper drawer of the fridge (or in a bag in the fridge). Try it in the recipe of the week!

Fresh Sweet Onions– (White) perfect for raw eating in salads, sandwiches, or wraps. Also perfect for fresh salasa and gazpacho. Store these in the crisper drawer or a plastic bag in the fridge (think scallions). Use them like scallions too–chopped into salads or soups, egg dishes, slaws or egg/potato dishes. Chop up the white parts and the tender greens. Split the stalk down the middle with a knife then chop across the grain for half-rounds. If you don’t care for raw onions, you can always give them a quick sautee first to take out the bite and bring out the sweet. Cut into wedges (like an apple) then peel the layers apart for great dipping scoops.

Carrots- crunchy sweet and delicious. We think you’ll like our carrots good enough to eat plain. But they also work well shredded into salads and slaws or sliced into stir-fry. Grilled carrots are also delicious. Just scrub and dry, then coat in oil and salt, olive oil works well, slit larger ones down the middle. Then place them on the grill over medium-high heat until just lightly charred, then flip them over and repeat. Carrots should have grill lines and light charring, but still have just a little snap (tender-crisp) in the middle. Carrots store very well in a bag in the fridge or crisper drawer with the tops removed.

Broccoli or Cauliflower- These two vegetables, are unique in many ways, but can be used interchangeably in most recipes. Stores well in a bag in the crisper drawer for a few days. Can chopped into bite-size pieces, blanched and frozen for fresh green flavor in the wintertime. Both can be lightly steamed and served with lemon juice, butter, or cheese and salt.

Snap Beans- Fresh Beans are lovely and easy to use. These will be green, purple, yellow, and/or speckled. The purple and speckled beans will lose some of their color when cooked. A light steaming or simple marinade will do the trick to make them a tasty addition to any dish. Steam them and drizzle with oil or butter and salt. Also great for eating fresh (raw) or with dip. Will keep well in a bag in the fridge.

Zucchini- Enjoy some of the last zucchinis of the season. These are easy to use, a light steam or a simple marinade is enough. Can be used for baking or in egg/pasta dishes. Stores well in the crisper drawer.

Tomatillos- These funny little fruits are the base of many green sauces in central American cuisine. Salsa verde is easy to make and very delicious. I prefer it made with cilantro, which will be coming next week, and these will easily save till then in the fridge. But you could make it using the parsley that’s in this week’s box too! Tomatillos are best roasted, simply remove from the husk and roast in a pan or place right on the grill until lightly charred and heated throughout. Puree with fresh onions, garlic, and herbs and any hot peppers you may like. Also makes great sauce for stews, look back on the website for pork and roasted Tomatillo stew recipe.

Hot Peppers- (Jalapenos or shishitos) Jalapenos are thicker walled and darker green with smooth skin. Almost all of them are spicy, but the heat level will vary from one to the next.

The shishitos have thinner, wrinkled skin that is typically light green in color. Most are mild and savory, but about 1 in 4 will carry some heat. To determine, just taste the smallest bit from the bottom (blossom end) of the pepper. The tops of peppers are typically hottest. Shishitos are really good grilled or roasted until lightly charred. All peppers store well in the crisper drawer or in a bag/container if more than a few days. And either kind will go great in a fresh or roasted salsa.

Cherry Tomatoes– (Full shares only, this week) Stores well on the counter or table out of direct light. So fresh, so good, so easy. Use as a ready snack or to dazzle with a few halved on a salad or the side of a plate—to really make it pop! Stores best on the counter out of direct sunlight. I can’t believe you won’t eat them all right away, but if you wish to keep them, they can be frozen whole (tops gently removed.) Then used for soups or as extra fancy ice cubes for bloody Marys.

Slicing tomatoes– Also best stored out of the fridge. Use on sandwiches, salads or wraps. These big slicers are good for enjoying a nice thick slice alongside a meal. Serve plain, with salt, brown sugar, or pesto on top. Store on the countertop out of direct light. Many heirloom varieties ripen from bottom to top. Slice them vertically to fully appreciate the flavor profile of these exquisite fruits. These are the perfect tomatoes for the recipe of the week (though any will certainly work).

Paste Tomatoes-These are the sturdy, typically smaller and lighter red tomatoes. They store well out of the fridge, but their primary purpose is to be less juicy than slicers, so the fridge won’t hurt them too bad if you want to store them until the cilantro comes next week! These are the perfect tomatoes for pico de gallo (fresh salsa) or for making sauce, as they contain more solids and less juice.

Fresh Garlic– This beautiful garlic is just like cured garlic except that the flavor is brighter (better for fresh eating) and they won’t store all winter in your pantry. They haven’t been cured yet, so keep them someplace cool or in the fridge (in a container, if you’re concerned about the odor). And try to use them in the next week or so.

Recipe of the week…

Spanish-style Gazpacho

(Adapted from New York Times Cooking see the full recipe at… https://cooking.nytimes.com/recipes/1017577-best-gazpacho)

This is a new take on gazpacho for me, and frankly, a welcome one. This recipe emulsifies the liquid with olive oil (good olive oil will shine here) and strains out the chunky little bits, resulting in a lovely and satisfying experience.

  • 2 lbs fresh tomatoes, preferably slicers, chopped
  • 1 fresh cucumber, peeled and chopped
  • ½ sweet bell pepper, or a small shishito/piece of jalapeno (paprika is an acceptable substitute here)
  • 1 clove garlic, minced
  • 1 small fresh onion, chopped
  • 2 branches of fresh parsley per cup (to garnish)
  • 2 teaspoons white wine vinegar
  • Salt to taste
  • ½ cup good olive oil

Puree veggies together in a blender or with a wand thoroughly until smooth.

With the motor running add vinegar and some salt. Then drizzle in the olive oil slowly while pureeing at high speed.

The color will change and the texture will thicken until velvety-smooth.

Strain contents through a sieve or food mill to remove the solids.

Chill in a glass pitcher until cold.

Serve In tumblers or frosted mugs with a sprig or two of parsley, or chopped fresh parsley as a garnish on top.

Serves 8-12 (approx. 1 quart)

-Enjoy!

Best guess for next week:

  • Melons!!
  • Beets
  • Cilantro
  • Celery
  • Tomatoes
  • Sweet Peppers
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Kale
  • Cucumbers
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2018 CSA Newsletter: July 25, Week 8 http://www.reddoorfamilyfarm.com/2018-csa-newsletter-july-25-week-8/ Wed, 25 Jul 2018 19:03:07 +0000 http://www.reddoorfamilyfarm.com/?p=1532 Farm News

Iris turned 3 this week! Leona says that she is officially a kid and not a baby or a toddler anymore. I have to say that I agree. She is such a little person now!

We had an amazing time at our first farm to table dinner on Saturday night. The food was outstanding, the barn looked incredible, the music was awesome, and everyone really seemed to be enjoying themselves. For those of you who could make it, thanks for coming to share in a meal with us. Tell your friends and come again! For those who couldn’t make it, there are two dinners left to sign up for so there is still time. Don’t miss out, the tickets are starting to go!

The farm was in high speed all week, between preparing and cleaning up for the dinner and doing all of the other tasks that late July asks of us, we have been running like crazy. The harvests are getting heavy and we are getting “farm fit”, as we like to tell ourselves. Now that the CSA boxes have been packed and most of the dishes have been done all that is left is finishing off that Redeye keg and singing happy birthday a few more times to our little big kid.

July 25th, Week 8

Clockwise from top: Rainbow carrots, oregano, colorful beans, cabbage, zucchini, potatoes, peppers, tomatoes, onions, broccoli. Please enjoy.

Announcements:

U-pick beans are available!

Email to set up a time to pick.

In your box this week…

Broccoli

Rainbow Carrots

Potatoes

Tomatoes

Zucchinis

Colorful Snap Beans

Peppers

Fresh Sweet Onions

Cabbage

Fresh Oregano

Eggplant (small shares)

Blueberries (small shares)

Coffee- (optional)

Weekly Serving Suggestions:

Potatoes- Last week of New Potatoes for a while now. These beauties have been a staple around our house for the last couple of weeks. We love and enjoy them. Now we’re eating leftover potato salad from our Farm Dinner last weekend. These store best in the fridge and are great for roasting, frying, grilling and boiling. Not so much for baked potatoes or mashed potatoes. Enjoy them while they’re here!

Fresh Oregano– Is delicious and versatile. Fresh oregano has a much sweeter, stronger flavor than dried. But you can use a lot more of it without it tasting bitter. Oregano holds up well to heat, but fresh oregano can be added at the end, too for a powerful flavor burst. Works great for potato salad, soups, sauces, egg dishes, pairs well with chicken and pork, and is pretty easy to meld into almost any flavor profile.

Colorful Snap Bean Medley– These beans are so pretty! Tender enough to eat fresh with a dip or plain. But also hearty enough for a quick sautee or grilling. The color and flavor will be best without too much heat, try really hot for just a couple of minutes, but still a little crisp on the inside.

Fresh Sweet Onions– perfect for raw eating in salads, sandwiches, or wraps. Store these in the crisper drawer or a plastic bag in the fridge (think scallions). Use them like scallions too–chopped into salads or soups, egg dishes, slaws or egg/potato dishes. Chop up the white parts and the tender greens. Split the stalk down the middle with a knife then chop across the grain for half-rounds. If you don’t care for raw onions, you can always give them a quick sautee first to take out the bite and bring out the sweet. Or, cut into wedges (like an apple) then peel the layers apart for great dipping scoops.

Rainbow Carrots- Beautiful, crunchy, sweet and delicious. Perfect for shredding or shaving into salads! We think you’ll like our carrots good enough to eat plain. But they also work well shredded into salads and slaws or sliced into stir-fry. Grilled carrots are also delicious. Just scrub and dry, then coat in oil and salt, olive oil works well, slit larger ones down the middle. Then place them on the grill over medium-high heat until just lightly charred, then flip them over and repeat. Carrots should have grill lines and light charring, but still have just a little snap (tender-crisp) in the middle. Carrots store very well in a bag in the fridge or crisper drawer. Carrot tops are edible, but these aren’t the best, so I’d just remove and discard before bagging the carrots.

Eggplant (smalls only)- The best way to use eggplant is to roast or grill it until crispy and charred, then cook more slowly until tender inside. Eggplant also likes oil, so don’t be afraid to cook it with plenty of olive oil, butter, bacon, etc. Roasted eggplant can be pureed into Baba Ghanouj. Stores well in the crisper drawer.

Cabbage- So many fun new ideas for cabbage on the internet these days, roasting and grilling. But the simplest, for this time of year is still a fresh slaw! Simple and light, easy to make ahead, and won’t heat up the kitchen! Stores great in the crisper drawer.

Broccoli- Fresh and lovely, chop the florets and shred the stalk for slaws, or chop into long “trees” for dipping. Also, great served with a light steaming in salted water and served with a squeeze of lemon or a sprinkling of shredded cheese. Stores best in a bag in the crisper drawer. Cut stalks into spears for dipping.

Peppers- Sweet peppers are such a lovely treat. They store great in the fridge, but they’re so easy to use, we rarely ever have to keep them long. Great for fresh eating with dips or shaved into salads. Grilled peppers are one of my very favorite foods. Could be done as a shish kebab, or just grilled whole. Also, they can grilled in a pan or fine grate chopped with onions, and new potatoes, zucchinis, beans and even eggplants! The purple peppers are thin walled and best eaten fresh. The green peppers are thicker walled and will hold up to more cooking!

Slicing tomatoes– Use on sandwiches, salads or wraps. These big slicers are good for enjoying a nice thick slice alongside a meal. Serve plain, with salt, brown sugar, or pesto on top. Also, chopped tomatoes go great on top of roasted potatoes with oregano! Store on the countertop out of direct light.

Zucchini- So ready to cook, just chop and throw into almost anything. Eggs, stirfry, pasta sauce, soups, etc. Or slice and marinade for salads. Try shredding and salting, then allowing the liquid to drain off for 10-15 mins before mixing with egg and frying to make zucchini fritters (add garlic, oregano, and curry powder). Serve with yogurt!

Stores well in the crisper drawer.

Coffee  Organic Colombia Coffee- My personal favorite!

Recipe of the week…

Grilled Veggie Fajitas

These are a great way to make a healthy meal on the grill without heating up the house. Serve with grilled new potatoes! No grill? No problem, these can be made just the same in a pan under the broiler… Grilled chicken, pork, or beef could easily be added too!

  • Juice from 2 limes (or 1 oz lime juice)
  • 2-4 Tbsp oil
  • 2 Tbsp fresh oregano, chopped
  • 1 teaspoon dried cumin
  • ½ teaspoon chili powder (or paprika)
  • ¼ cup fresh cilantro, chopped (or parsley)
  • Salt and pepper, to taste
  • 8-12 flour tortillas, fajita style
  • 2 medium onions, cut in wedges
  • 2 bell peppers, cut into strips (I use one purple and one green)
  • 1-2 zucchini squash, halved and cut into strips like peppers
  • 4 garlic cloves, pressed
  • 1 jalapeño, cut into thin strips (optional)
  • 1 tomato, cut into wedges

For marinade, combine and stir: juice of lime, oil, spices, cilantro, and salt and pepper to taste in a measuring cup.

Combine all veggies and garlic (except the tomato) in a bowl, add marinade, and mix well. You can use your hands for this. You don’t need to let the marinade sit with the veggies, but you can if you want.

Grill veggies in large skillet on medium-high heat and cook until desired tenderness. Add tomatoes at the last minute so that they are lightly cooked.

Grill tortillas and place grilled vegetables in them. Serve with a side of beans topped with fresh diced jalapeño if not using on the inside.

*Serve with hot sauce, salsa and/or sour cream

*Adapted from plantbasedonabudget.com

-Enjoy!

Best guess for next week: (Salsa week!)

  • Tomatoes
  • Tomatillos
  • Onions
  • Cilantro
  • Jalapenos
  • Garlic
  • Peppers
  • Cucumbers
  • Carrots
  • Broccoli/Cauliflower
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2018 CSA Newsletter: July 18, Week 7 http://www.reddoorfamilyfarm.com/2018-csa-newsletter-july-18-week-7/ Thu, 19 Jul 2018 00:26:43 +0000 http://www.reddoorfamilyfarm.com/?p=1521 Farm News

We loved that rain shower this week! The night before we were up late planting carrots and beets that will be storage crops throughout the winter. I can’t imagine what farming would have been like before having the weather report available at your fingertips at any moment!

Carrots are a tricky crop because they take a while to germinate which gives weeds a chance to beat them out. We take a lot of time prepping carrot beds to make sure the carrots win. First, we chisel plow and then disk the area to break down the cover crop and kill off anything else that might be growing. Then we wait a week or so to let the soil digest the green trash. We make raised beds with our bed shaper, water them and wait two weeks to allow the weed seeds to germinate. Next, we run the tine weeder over the beds, which only disturbs the very top few inches of soil to kill the baby weeds without pulling up more seeds. Finally, we are ready to plant the carrots!

Once the seeds are planted we wait anywhere from 5-13 days depending on the weather and take a flame weeder over the beds to burn up any quick germinating weeds before the carrots are up. The flame weeder is pretty slick, it has 4 torches that hover about 5 or 6 inches over the bed and rolls slowly over burning everything up. It is the only real way to get the weeds without damaging the teeny tiny carrots about to pop. Once they are up we take our cultivation tractor over the beds every week but we will still need to hand weed each bed one time.

It’s a lot of work but we are getting better and better at it each year, making the hand weed a less intense ordeal.

July 18th, Week 7

Clockwise from top: Beets, cherry tomatoes, leeks, eggplant, blueberries (thanks to Half Moon hill), peppers, head lettuce, slicing heirloom tomatoes, green bean, zucchini/summer squash, cucumbers, potatoes, flower! Please enjoy.

Announcements:

Thanks for the blueberries Half Moon Hill Farm! We traded vegetables for blueberries to share with you all. Small shares should get them next week.

In your box this week…

Head Lettuce

New Potatoes

Sage

Green Peppers

Cherry Tomatoes

Slicing Tomatoes

Leeks

Beets

Eggplant- Fulls

Green Beans

Zucchini

Cucumbers

Blueberries!!!- Fulls this week

Coffee- (optional)

Weekly Serving Suggestions:

Head Lettuce– Fresh, crisp and refreshing. Head lettuce stores well in a bag in the fridge. And works great for wraps and sandwiches. I’d recommend a BLT.

Sage- Drier than your average fresh herb, sage works well for frying, just a quick minute will crisp them beautifully and leave the oil in the pan flavored too. Try chopping some onto roasted new potatoes. Stores well in a bag in the fridge.

New PotatoesNot for storage. These beautiful baby red potatoes are so lovely! Pretty red skins are tender (no need to peel) and appetizing. These are young spuds that will work very well for potato salad, boiled or roasted potatoes. Not the best for baking or mashing. My favorite is to boil them until just tender, but not crumbly. Then toss them with butter, salt and pepper, then top with fresh parsley. These potatoes are not mature/cured so store them in the fridge until ready to use, will keep for several weeks in a bag or crisper. But fresher is better. Wash and dry them then coat with oil and sage. Fry or roast them until crispy outside. Season with salt, Sage and a dash of vinegar if you like!

Green Peppers– Fresh and crunchy, perfect for dipping. I love hummus and veggies this time of year. Also great diced into the Potato Salad. Or with fried new potatoes. Stores well in the fridge.

Leeks– Fresh tender leeks are a joy to work with, great for stirring into soups, but in this weather, I prefer to split them down the middle, wash and dry them, then coat with olive oil salt and pepper, before roasting them on the grill. Leeks store well in the crisper drawer.

Beets– Bold and beautiful. Roasted or grilled beet wedges are great on a salad or slice them thin for a pizza topping. Beet greens are great too, sautee them with eggs or potatoes. Remove them from the beets for the best storage. Betts will keep well in the crisper drawer, greens keep best in a bag.

Zucchini- Great on the grill, but also good in a stir fry if you don’t cook them too long. We eat them marinated in salad dressing cut into slices or spears and just raw as a side.

Green Beans – Fresh and tender. Great for raw snacking with or without dip. Also great chopped and blanched to add to your Potato Salad! Stores well in the crisper with the vent closed. These hold up well to quick high heat, perfect for grilling or roasting.

Slicing Tomatoes- Store out of the fridge for best quality, in the fridge for longest shelf-life. It’s tomato season again! These slicers are big and beautiful, but also full of flavor (because they’re picked ripe.) That also means that they are juicy (since that’s where the flavor is!) A tomato like this is a whole different food than what you typically find in a supermarket. Enjoy in thick slices with salt or pesto. Chop to pair with roasted potatoes, or salt and strain to add to potato salad, reserve the juice for your aoli (homemade mayo).

Cherry TomatoesBest left out of the fridge! So fresh, so good, so easy. Just one of my kids will handily eat a whole pint in a sitting if we’re not careful. Use as a ready snack or to dazzle with a few halved on a salad or the side of a plate—to really make it pop! Stores on the counter out of direct sunlight.

Eggplant– Most of us don’t get too excited about eggplant. But eggplant do an amazing job of soaking up and holding on to delicious fats and oils. Sautee them with bacon or soak them in olive oil before grilling. Either way, they’re delicious! Stores well in the crisper drawer.

Coffee Organic Mexico Coffee-

Recipe of the week…

Veggie Love Pile

If you’ll pardon the salacious name, this is how we often refer to a bunch of seasonal veggies all kept as whole as possible (to still be appealing) and each roasted to perfection before being mixed together and dressed.

This can be made almost any time of year with whatever is seasonally available. I’ll describe how I’d do it with the contents of this week’s box. The key is timing and/or sizing and the result is well, delicious.

-1 lb small new potatoes left whole or halved depending on size.

-2-3 medium beets quartered

-1 green pepper, cut into 8 pieces

– 2 leeks quartered into long thin spears

-1 large handful of green beans topped

-1 medium/small zucchini, cut into ½ rounds

-1 small eggplant, chopped into ½ “ half-moons

-1/2 cup good olive oil, separated

-several leaves of fresh sage (or any other herb)

-2 splashes of good vinegar or lemon juice

-salt and pepper (to taste)

Wash and scrub potatoes, beets, and anything else you want. Then chop and dry, keeping separate. Toss each ingredient with oil, enough to coat before roasting.

Roast or grill on high heat the beets and potatoes until well browned but still slightly firm inside. Remove from heat and add to a large serving bowl. Toss with plenty of salt, black pepper, and chopped herbs.

Roast or grill eggplant, zucchini and leeks all together in a roasting pan or fine grill grate. Until lightly charred. Add to potato mixture.

Roast or grill beans and peppers until bright green and just tender, then add to mixture and toss with vinegar and any remaining oil

Garnish and serve while still warm.

-Enjoy!

Best Guess for next week:

-Salad Mix

-Rainbow Carrots

-Broccoli

-Spring Onions

-Tomatoes

-Zucchini

-Green Beans

-Cherry tomatoes

 

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2018 CSA Newsletter: July 11, Week 6 http://www.reddoorfamilyfarm.com/2018-csa-newsletter-july-11-week-6/ Tue, 10 Jul 2018 21:35:18 +0000 http://www.reddoorfamilyfarm.com/?p=1511 Farm News

Whew! Kind of hot out there! I guess it really is July. I hope you had a wonderful 4th and thanks to everyone who scooted around to pick their shares up at different times/locations. I’m glad the 4th won’t put a damper on our drop day for a good long time again!

We have been getting up for 6 am start times since early June, but this is the time of year where it really pays off. We try to make sure all leafy things are harvested before the sun heats things up, and that makes each morning a bit of a mad scramble. It is however, pretty satisfying to get so much done before my kids are even out of bed and we get to see some great sunrises too.

This week we are spending some good quality time with our tomatoes. Have you even wondered why heirloom tomatoes are so expensive? Well, let’s start with what an heirloom tomato is. An heirloom tomato is an open pollenated variety that has been passed down for more than 40 years. Most heirlooms were selected for characteristics like beauty, flavor, and adaptability (cold or hot climates). It wasn’t until recently that our desired characteristics have focused on traits like shelf life, uniformity, and transport durability, making our tomatoes easier to mass produce and ship around the world but far less delicious. We will leave certain hybrids (which are neither heirloom nor mealy and tasteless) out of the conversation for the moment.

So back to our original question, why so expensive? Heirloom tomato varieties, although very delicious, are all of the things that we are not accustom to getting anymore as consumers. They crack, they ripen unevenly, they have dimples and wrinkles, they have a short storage life, and have little tolerance for disease. They are difficult to grow on a farm scale (even a small family farm scale) for the quality and shelf life to be acceptable. All of our heirlooms are started in our greenhouse, transplanted once into larger containers, then transplanted into our hoophouses. They don’t do well outside because of the fluctuation of weather causes cracking, disease and rotting. They are trellised and pruned once a week (sometimes once in two weeks depending on growth) which takes 3 people about 3 hours. The trellising and pruning as well as ground mulch between all of the rows helps us mitigate disease. We also sanitize everything that goes in and comes out of the hoophouse and open and close the sides and doors of the hoophouse to control temperature daily. Watering happens through drip irrigation under the ground cloth. The tomatoes get about an inch of water every week but it is important to keep the humidity low enough that dew doesn’t easily form on the leaves overnight (also disease prevention). They get fertilized with composted chicken manure right before the fruit sets and fish emulsion periodically after that. All of this happens for months before we even get a single tomato!

When it is finally time to start the harvest (had our first one this week!) it takes an extreme amount of care not to bruise these delicate little gems. They need to be stored at about 50 degrees in a dry place and we only let them sit for a maximum of 2 days before they need a home.

When you get your first taste of our heirloom tomatoes, I think that you will agree that it is all worth it!

July 11th, Week 6

Clockwise from top: Italian flat leaf parsley, cucumbers, salad mix, celery, green peppers, new potatoes, pole beans, scallions, and cherry tomatoes. Please enjoy.

Announcements:

July 21st farm dinner is coming right up! It will be a vegetable focused meal but also have our pasture raised chicken. It will be catered by Urban Street Bistro using, almost exclusively, ingredients from our farm!

Chickens for sale- $4.50/lb

Sold whole and fresh (never frozen). They are butchered here on our farm and must be preordered. We can deliver preordered chickens to the Wausau Farmers market or they can be picked up on the farm. Call or email for details.

In your box this week…

Salad Mix

New Potatoes

Parsley

Green Peppers

Cherry Tomatoes (full shares)

Slicing Tomatoes (small shares)

Green Onions (scallions)

Cucumbers

Celery

Pole Beans

Coffee- (optional)

Weekly Serving Suggestions:

Salad mix– Fresh lettuce mix, perfect for filling wraps or sandwiches, but also great as a salad. Dress t up or dress it down. Stores well in a bag in the fridge.

Parsley- I love parsley for its versatility. Brightens almost any dish and pairs well with almost all other herbs for a nice blend. Stores great in a plastic bag in the fridge, especially with the cut ends wrapped in a wet paper towel.

New PotatoesNot for storage. These beautiful baby red potatoes are so lovely! Pretty red skins are tender (no need to peel) and appetizing. These are young spuds that will work very well for potato salad, boiled or roasted potatoes. Not the best for baking or mashing. My favorite is to boil them until just tender, but not crumbly. Then toss them with butter, salt and pepper, then top with fresh parsley. These potatoes are not mature/cured so store them in the fridge until ready to use, will keep for several weeks in a bag or crisper. But fresher is better. Try boiling them in salted water until just barely tender, then smashing them just enough to slightly flatten and break the skins, but still hold together. Then fry or roast them until crispy outside. Season with salt, parsley and a dash of vinegar if you like!

Green Peppers– Fresh and crunchy, perfect for dipping. I love hummus and veggies this time of year. Also great diced into the Potato Salad, try the recipe of the week. Stores well in the fridge.

Cucumbers– So fresh, so easy. Just slice and serve. Or try topping with salt or seasoning. Also great chopped and stirred into plain yogurt as a dressing for seasoned meats or whole grain salads. Try the recipe of the week! Stores well in the crisper drawer of the fridge (or in a bag in the fridge). Add them to a potato salad, simply chop them up and toss them lightly with salt in a colander. Allow the liquid to drain off for 10 mins, before stirring them in.

Scallions– Tender and versatile. These are tough enough for a quick sautee, but sweet and tender enough to be chopped finely and added as a garnish or a fresh dish. Stores well in a bag in the fridge or crisper drawer.

Celery- This may be the best we’ve ever grown. Full of flavor and not too tough. Try slicing finely across the grain to add to salads or the recipe of the week. Otherwise chop into sticks for dipping! Stores well in a bag in the crisper drawer.

Pole Beans – Big, but tender. Great for raw snacking with or without dip. Also great chopped and blanched to add to your Potato Salad! Stores well in the crisper with the vent closed. These hold up well to quick high heat, perfect for grilling or roasting.

Slicing Tomatoes- Store out of the fridge for best quality, in the fridge for longest shelf-life. It’s tomato season again! These slicers are big and beautiful, but also full of flavor (because they’re picked ripe.) That also means that they are juicy (since that’s where the flavor is!) A tomato like this is a whole different food than what you typically find in a supermarket. Enjoy in thick slices with salt or pesto. Chop to pair with roasted potatoes, or salt and strain to add to potato salad, reserve the juice for your aoli (homemade mayo).

Cherry TomatoesBest left out of the fridge! So fresh, so good, so easy. Just one of my kids will handily eat a whole pint in a sitting if we’re not careful. Use as a ready snack or to dazzle with a few halved on a salad or the side of a plate—to really make it pop! Stores on the counter out of direct sunlight.

Coffee Organic Mexico Coffee

Recipe of the week…

New-Potato Salad

Perfect make-ahead dish for a get together, or for a week’s worth of packed lunches!

There are two secrets to this dish. One is fresh new-potatoes. The other is the homemade mayo (aoli) for the dressing.

-2 lbs new potatoes washed and cut just enough to make roughly equal sized pieces.

-3 stalks celery, chopped fine

-1 green pepper, diced

– 1 or 2 scallions, chopped finely

-1/2 bunch pole beans, chopped and blanched (quickly steamed or sautéed)

-1/4 cup fresh herb (parsley, dill, oregano, and/or cilantro) chopped fine

*optional- Diced tomato and or cucumber salted and strained.

-Bacon crumbled or chopped

Dressing-

-2 eggs

-½ cup olive oil (or your preference)

-1 Tbsp mustard or horseradish

-2 Tbsp salt (added slowly to taste)

-1Tsp black pepper

-3 Tbsp lemon juice, or 2 Tbsp vinegar

Ahead of time: Add new potatoes to boiling salted water. Cook until tender, but not floury, about 10-15 mins depending on size and number. Remove from water and allow to cool. If adding tomato or cucumber, chop, salt and allow to drain.

Make dressing, add all the ingredients except oil and ½ of the salt. Puree in blender or with immersion blender. Slowly dribble in the oil while blending until creamy, smooth, and slightly thickened. Add remaining salt and additional lemon juice to taste. It should be powerfully salty and tart to balance starchiness of the potatoes, but it shouldn’t turn your mouth inside out.

Chop cooled potatoes and other veggies into bit-size pieces. Fold into dressing until evenly coated. Taste for “pop!” Once done, allow to rest for at least ½ hour for flavors to meld-much more is also fine.

-Enjoy!

Best Guess for next week:

-Salad Mix

-Carrots

-Cucumbers

-Spring Onions

-Celery

-Zucchini

-Fennel

-Cherry tomatoes

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